Nigeria—Malaria Action Program for States (MAPS)

Client: U.S. Agency for International Development

Duration: 2010-2016

Region: Sub-Saharan Africa

Country: Nigeria

Solutions: Global Health

The Malaria Action Program for States (MAPS) was a comprehensive five-year program that increased coverage and use of life-saving malaria interventions in support of the Nigeria National Malaria Strategic Plan and the National Malaria Elimination Program.

The MAPS consortium was led by FHI 360 in partnership with DAI Global Health and Malaria Consortium. DAI Global Health was responsible for strengthening the management capacity of the State Ministry of Health and local government area health personnel to provide oversight of malaria interventions. DAI Global Health provided on-the-job capacity building through a long-term team based at the federal and state levels supporting training, supervision, and financial management with intermittent external consultancy expertise.

Sample Activities

  • Support the scale-up of proven malaria interventions.
  • Maintain a high level of insecticide-treaded bednets.
  • Improve malaria case management at facility and community level.
  • Promote positive behaviours through information, education, and behaviour change communication activities, facilitating community mobilisation.

Select Results

  • Developed, implemented, and reviewed annual operational plans and local government area plans for malaria control in elimination in nine states and local government areas.
  • Implemented and embedded integrated supportive supervision systems in seven states.
  • Trained more than 1,400 policy makers, managers, and service providers.
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