Guyana—EcoMicro Guyana

Client: Inter-American Development Bank

Duration: 2018-2021

Region: Latin America and the Caribbean

Country: Guyana

Solutions: Environment and Energy Economic Growth

The Institute of Private Enterprise Development (IPED)’s Green Finance for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency for Micro, Small, and Medium-Sized Enterprises (EcoMicro Guyana) project is part of the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB)’s green energy portfolio in Latin America and the Caribbean. The IDB is being financed on this project by Global Affairs Canada.

Headquartered in Georgetown, IPED is a microfinance bank with a national presence dedicated to helping Guyanese businesses finance their growth. Under the EcoMicro program, DAI’s Sustainable Business Group will extend its existing partnership with IPED in Guyana.

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Sample Activities

  • Assist IPED and its regional branch offices to develop green loan products.
  • Design survey and train IPED loan staff to survey a range of businesses, including agri-processors, retail shops, hostelry, and catering businesses.
  • Assist businesses to responsibly finance the purchase of renewable energy generation and energy-efficient technologies, including new or upgraded refrigeration units, solar panels, and optimal insulation materials.
  • Design a digital tool for IPED’s loan officers to screen climate risk as part of their loan underwriting process and assist IPED in developing an institutional greening policy.
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