Tunisia—Green Economy Financing Facility (Tunisia GEFF)

Client: European Bank for Reconstruction and Development

Duration: 2019-2023

Region: Middle East and North Africa

Country: Tunisia

Solutions: Environment

The Tunisia Green Economy Financing Facility (Tunisia GEFF) is a €130 million credit facility channeled through Tunisian banks and leasing companies to private sector sub-borrowers for investment in technologies and services that support the transition to a green economy.

Tunisia GEFF, similar to other such facilities implemented by DAI, addresses a lack of available capital and experience which has hindered Tunisian businesses’ uptake of sustainable and efficient energy technologies and practices. These types of facilities have facilitated hundreds of green finance deals, leading to positive financial and environmental outcomes for businesses, residents, and communities.

Sample Activities

  • Build the capacity of partner banks to develop loan products and assess applications for financing efficient energy projects.
  • Assist small and medium businesses to identify cost-efficient energy upgrades.
  • Implement strategic marketing to promote Tunisia GEFF to banks, businesses, and business associations.
  • Work with suppliers of energy-efficient equipment and maintain a mechanism to promote uptake of energy-efficient technology in Tunisia.
  • Ensure transfer of skills to financial institutions, local engineers, and businesses to sustain Tunisia’s efficient energy market.
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