Max Goldensohn joined the Peace Corps after college and spent two years in Gabon building schools with villagers in remote communities. After graduate school, Max went to Laos as a civilian volunteer during the Vietnam War and taught future teachers to do community development. By then he was thoroughly bitten by the international development bug, and has since worked for 40 years in program management, capacity building, training, and monitoring and evaluation, including more than 20 years managing long-term projects in agribusiness and agricultural production in the developing world. Max has augmented his expertise with a deep understanding of strategy development, planning and capacity building, and the impact of policy on citizens’ lives, all of it grounded in his training in anthropology.

“DAI always tries to play from a position of superior virtue when it deals with beneficiaries, partners, subcontractors, and funding organizations. This has led me to stick with DAI and to return to the company after a brief separation.” — Max Goldensohn

Max’s work and results cover many disciplines, including: natural resource management; rural health delivery systems; trans-regional initiatives; partnership building between farmers, water-users, entrepreneurs, villagers, city-dwellers, government, and the private sector; and planning and orientation exercises.

He has lived and worked in Laos, Gabon, Mauritania, Mali, Sri Lanka, Zaire, Egypt, and Colombia. Max has served as Chief of Party of major USAID-funded projects in Mauritania, Zaire, Sri Lanka and Egypt and as country director in Colombia for the Pan-American Development Foundation. “More than anything else, I have enjoyed my time as a long-term, resident manager of projects,” Max says. “Living for two to five years in a place gives you the chance to have a real impact on people’s lives.” Max is fluent in French and Spanish; useful in German; formerly fluent or useful in Egyptian Arabic, Sinhala, Kiswahili, Ngbandi, Lingala, Lao, and Soninke.

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