DAI Hosts Twitter Chat on Women and ICT

March 18, 2014

As part of a month-long Devex campaign on the contributions of women and girls in developing countries, DAI hosted a live Twitter chat this week.

With a stable of nine panelists with experience in mobile technology, gender mainstreaming, health care, trade, and governance—our chat focused on how women and development programs can leverage information and communications technology (ICT) to support economic empowerment (mobile banking, access to markets and employment), social empowerment (access to information, reporting and monitoring tools), and physical empowerment (mobile health).

Panelists included Joshua Haynes, Senior Development Technologist and Media Adviser from the U.S. Agency for International Development; Jacob Korenblum, President and CEO of SoukTel; Chrissy Martin, global partnership manager at Zoona; Linda Raftree, an ICT consultant, and Kristen Roggemann, mobile and emerging markets specialist with GSMA’s mWomen Program.

Panelists from DAI included Senior ICT Specialist Jaclyn Carlsen, Senior ICT Specialist Jessica Heinzelman, Global Practice Lead for Gender and Trade Anne Simmons-Benton, and Global Practice Lead for Health, Nutrition & Livelihoods Kirsten Weeks.

Topics discussed include how programs can be designed to include women from the start; how to engage girls and young women differently from older women; how use ICT to empower women in conflict zones safely and securely; and lastly, how to make sure women are not inadvertently excluded by development work.

As promised, here’s a list of key resources shared during the one-hour chat:

The SheBuilds campaign runs through April 4.

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